Criggion quarry community page

Hello future

On 02 October 2023 we rebranded to Heidelberg Materials. As well as aligning with our parent company, our new name better reflects the company we are today.

We’re focused on driving down carbon emissions, increasing the use of recycled materials to grow the circular economy and leading our industry towards net zero with innovative projects such as carbon capture and storage.

Some of the new Heidelberg Materials signage and vehicle livery is already in place and we hope to have completed this within the next two years. Please note that our email and website details have also changed.
 

Find out more

About the quarry

Criggion Quarry is set in the Breidden Hills on the mid wales border, between Powys and Shropshire. The quarry is a hard rock igneous deposit(basalt) mainly use in the road construction industry.

The documented history of the quarry was started in 1866. Up until the mid-1960s the quarry was worked as one face, which was one of the highest faces in Britain (600 feet).  At the time it was worked by men on ropes perched on small rock ledges using hand held compressed air drills.

The quarry historically had a rail-line used to transport the aggregates but this was superseded by road haulage in the 1960’s.

Criggion is a site of special scientific interest (SSSI) due to the flora and also it is classified as an ancient monument due to the partial Iron Age hill fort which lies on the top of the quarry.

Interesting fact: The last man who worked the quarry by ropes in the traditional method only retired in 2008 after 44 years at the quarry.

 

Careers

We advertise our opportunities on the Heidelberg Materials website, leading online job boards and in print media. 

Learn more
Interesting fact: Quarrying started at Criggion in 1866 originally to supply material for cobbling the streets of Manchester and other cities.

 

Sponsorship

Criggion quarry supports and sponsors the local Scouting Association and some of the workforce work closely with the group on a weekly basis.

Hanson helps charities and voluntary groups in communities close to our sites and offices through the Hanson in the Community scheme.

Interesting fact: The quarry is one of the few in the country which used a gravity rock pass to transport material from the top of the hill to the bottom. This is worked by a shaft dipping at about 50 degrees which is fed onto a conveyor in a tunnel at the bottom of the high quarry face and then out to the processing plant.

 

Rare flowers get royal approval

 

HRH Prince Charles has opnened a new area of the National Botanic Garden of Wales that features rare flowers from Criggion quarry.

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Happy hikers enjoy overnight adventure

Steve Andrews put his best feet forward when he joined a group of scouts for a 12-mile sponsored walk from the disused Blodwell quarry to Criggion.

“Fifteen youngsters aged 11 to 13 took part,” said Criggion quarry manager Steve, who was joined on the hike by LEAD apprentice James Johnson.

“We started off at Blodwell and walked a couple of miles to Llanymynech before camping the night.

“The next day we hiked the rest of the way to Criggion quarry.

“The youngsters from the Four Crosses Scouting Unit carried their own kit all the way and raised £540, which Hanson kindly match funded.”

The money will help buy new camping equipment.

Plant partnership is a conservation success

The National Botanic Garden of Wales is creating a visitor display using material and rare plants from Criggion quarry. 

Read more

Site liaison

Steven Andrews - quarry manager

Email: steven.andrews@hanson.com
Tel: 01938 570 215

More info by clicking the pins

Become a supplier

Request more information on how to become a supplier.

Request information
Interesting fact: The quarry is one of the few in the country which used a gravity rock pass to transport material from the top of the hill to the bottom. This is worked by a shaft dipping at about 50 degrees which is fed onto a conveyor in a tunnel at the bottom of the high quarry face and then out to the processing plant.

 

Community visits

Some of Criggion Quarrys recent visitors include the local Women’s Institutes, local Scout and Cub groups, local archaeological associations and geological associations from far and wide.
If you are interested in upcoming visits, or would like to arrange one, please use the form below.

Find out more about community visits

Interesting fact:  The majority of stone from Criggion is supplied to the North West of England but has been known to be sold as far as France.